The problem with the Swedish housing market is that there are no houses and there is no market

(written by lawrence krubner, however indented passages are often quotes). You can contact lawrence at: lawrence@krubner.com

This seems a bit exaggerated:

In January, the government sat down with the centre-right opposition, hoping to reach an agreement on how to increase building. But the centre-left – wanting more state funded rental accommodation – clashed with the centre-right, which wants more deregulatory measures to encourage private construction.

“The problem with the Swedish housing market is that there are no houses and there is no market,” said Emil Kallstrom, a spokesman for the opposition Center Party after the centre-right pulled out of the talks last week.

Housing Minister Peter Eriksson accused the opposition of lacking the political will to deal with housing.

“You can lead a donkey to water, but you can’t force it to drink,” he said. Eriksson said the government will present propositions to parliament to speed up house building and that its target was in reach.

That sounds bad, but consider this:

From 2010 to 2015 158,549 new homes were created while the population rose by 435,447 people.

Assuming a normal 3 person family, and 3 people to a home, then the construction seems perfectly in line with population growth.

Source