The old German middle class feels itself losing out to the hipsters

(written by lawrence krubner, however indented passages are often quotes). You can contact lawrence at: lawrence@krubner.com

It is worrisome, that globalization has produced so much anger. Clearly, one can not build a global ecconomy, without first building global institutions.

A very good article on right-wing rage in Germany:

The success of the right-wing populists has a lot to do with changes that have occurred in Western societies, where a new class of disadvantaged has developed out of the erstwhile economic and political center – a new class which unabashedly took to the streets next to neo-Nazis in Chemnitz. The sociologist Andreas Reckwitz has described a “cultural devaluation and sense of rejection” felt by a section of the middle class that “believes it can no longer keep up” with the new avant-garde of hipsters and globalization’s winners. The result is that the global competition for resources has produced a new class of disadvantaged, and their lives are defined by a feeling of powerlessness – emotions that are fueling the AfD’s success. Other parties must find ways to address those feelings of impotency.

One solution could be found in a new concept of the modern state, which in the 1990s and 2000s was slimmed down to almost nothing in accordance with neoliberal obsessions. In the age of globalization and open borders, a strong, refurbished and functioning state that could fend off its enemies and protect its citizens would be a strong message that political leaders were regaining control. A state in which the courts could quickly decide who had the right to live in Germany and who did not; in which there were enough public prosecutors and police officers in addition to teachers and day care slots. Such a state must both demand more of the refugees who have come to Germany and provide them with more support, particularly when it comes to integration. And it must be prepared to impose penalties on them if, for example, they refuse to enroll in courses to learn the German language.

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