You can know someone day in, day out, love them completely and never really understand them

(written by lawrence krubner, however indented passages are often quotes). You can contact lawrence at: lawrence@krubner.com

Interesting:

And that occurred to me over and over again as I read through the book. Couples tend have a lot of the same squabbles over money, domestic labor division, sex, free time, for a reason. But this book is not really a test of this couple; it’s a test of marriage itself. In a way, it’s an indictment of an institution that will take even the most easy going, low-key, adventuresome couple and leave them standing in the kitchen arguing over who does more dishes and when was the last time they had sex.

That tedium offers up a pretty brutal truth: You can know someone day in, day out, love them completely and never really understand them. And still hate the way they fold a t-shirt. And still choose to stay.

It’s clear as the dates wind down that there is no shortcut to a verdict of forever. But somehow, the dates lay bare their every issue, the way their issues are their issues no matter what they do. When they cart that fake watermelon kid around, Jill surprises herself by being instantly pretty condescending toward Brook right away. When they survey their friends to find out what they think of the relationship, they learn some of them don’t even think they should be together. When they look at couples who’ve been together for decades, they see people resigned to stay together in spite of numerous upsets that any reasonable person would be forgiven for ditching on.

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