Disque is a distributed and fault tolerant message broker, so it works as middle layer among processes that want to exchange messages

(written by lawrence krubner, however indented passages are often quotes). You can contact lawrence at: lawrence@krubner.com

The people who gave us Redis announced a new project today:

Disque is a distributed and fault tolerant message broker, so it works as middle layer among processes that want to exchange messages.

Producers add messages that are served to consumers. Since message queues are often used in order to process delayed jobs, Disque often uses the term “job” in the API and in the documentation, however jobs are actually just messages in the form of strings, so Disque can be used for other use cases. In this documentation “jobs” and “messages” are used in an interchangeable way.

…Disque queues only provides best effort ordering. Each queue sorts messages based on the job creation time, which is obtained using the wall clock of the local node where the message was created (plus an incremental counter for messages created in the same millisecond), so messages created in the same node are normally delivered in the same order they were created. This is not causal ordering since correct ordering is violated in different cases: when messages are re-issued because not acknowledged, because of nodes local clock drifts, and when messages are moved to other nodes for load balancing and federation (in this case you end with queues having jobs originated in different nodes with different wall clocks). However all this also means that normally messages are not delivered in random order and usually messages created first are delivered first.

Note that since Disque does not provide strict FIFO semantics, technically speaking it should not be called a message queue, and it could better identified as a message broker. However I believe that at this point in the IT industry a message queue is often more lightly used to identify a generic broker that may or may not be able to guarantee order in all the cases.

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